Protective Effects by Dehydroascorbic Acid through an Anti-Oxidative Pathway and Toxic Effects by Ascorbic Acid through a Hydrogen Peroxide-Dependent Pathway in Tumor Cell Lines

  • Atsushi Satoh Department of Anti-Aging Food Research, School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo University of Technology, 1404-1 Katakura, Hachioji 192-0982, Japan
  • Naoya Kojima Department of Anti-Aging Food Research, School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo University of Technology, 1404-1 Katakura, Hachioji 192-0982, Japan
  • Takuya Iguchi Department of Anti-Aging Food Research, School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo University of Technology, 1404-1 Katakura, Hachioji 192-0982, Japan
  • Kenzoh Hamada Department of Anti-Aging Food Research, School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo University of Technology, 1404-1 Katakura, Hachioji 192-0982, Japan
  • Daiki Hasuike Department of Anti-Aging Food Research, School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo University of Technology, 1404-1 Katakura, Hachioji 192-0982, Japan
  • Hiroki Kawai Department of Anti-Aging Food Research, School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo University of Technology, 1404-1 Katakura, Hachioji 192-0982, Japan
  • Ryota Kobayashi Department of Anti-Aging Food Research, School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo University of Technology, 1404-1 Katakura, Hachioji 192-0982, Japan
  • Jian Zhang Department of Anti-Aging Food Research, School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo University of Technology, 1404-1 Katakura, Hachioji 192-0982, Japan
  • Xiaoqing Gai Department of Anti-Aging Food Research, School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo University of Technology, 1404-1 Katakura, Hachioji 192-0982, Japan
  • Takumi Satoh Department of Anti-Aging Food Research, School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo University of Technology, 1404-1 Katakura, Hachioji 192-0982, Japan
Keywords: Ascorbic acid; COS7 cells; Dehydroascorbic acid; Glucose transporter 1; Hela cells; Hydrogen peroxide;HT22 cells; Isoascorbic acid; Reactive oxygen species; T98G cells

Abstract

High concentrations of ascorbic acid (AA) exert pro-oxidative actions and inhibit tumor metastasis. The toxicity of AA centers on the generation of H2O2. But it remains largely unknown which process is inhibited by AA during the metastasis. The present study was designed to identify which process is suppressed by AA during the metastasis by use of malignant tumor cells lines. For this objective, we compared reduced and oxidized forms of AA in terms of cellular survival and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro. AA has ability to kill malignant tumor cells not binding to extracellular matrix. Once the cells detach from primary tumors, high concentrations of AA may drive them into a cell death pathway. The present results suggest that AA itself is toxic and that an oxidized form is protective. Thus, the reported neuroprotective effects may be mediated by an oxidized form, dehydroascorbate (DHA). This may be a therapeutic agent because it can penetrate the blood-brain-barrier. DHA protected the cells against oxidative stress by an anti-oxidative pathway. We did not find any protective effects by AA itself although it decreased levels of ROS much more than the oxidized form. Rather, AA induced potent toxic effects. It had selective toxic effects on non-attached cells. These selective toxic effects were suppressed by the presence of catalase, suggesting that H2O2 generation is involved in the cell death.

Published
2018-09-01
How to Cite
Satoh, A., Kojima, N., Iguchi, T., Hamada, K., Hasuike, D., Kawai, H., Kobayashi, R., Zhang, J., Gai, X., & Satoh, T. (2018). Protective Effects by Dehydroascorbic Acid through an Anti-Oxidative Pathway and Toxic Effects by Ascorbic Acid through a Hydrogen Peroxide-Dependent Pathway in Tumor Cell Lines. Reactive Oxygen Species, 6(17), 311–324. Retrieved from https://aimsci.com/ros/index.php/ros/article/view/149
Section
Original Research Articles